Insert:    
Visibility:     Module:   

Blog Posts

Appropriations Update and Take Action: Funding for Healthy Housing and Lead Poisoning Prevention

It has been a busy few weeks on the appropriations front for healthy housing.

The good news is that the Senate appropriations committee voted on June 25 for level funding for HUD and CDC healthy homes, lead poisoning prevention, and lead hazard control programs! THANK YOU to all of you for your sign-ons and phone calls to make this happen! This is all the more remarkable given the very severe budget caps!

Unfortunately, both Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and Health and Human Services (HHS) suffered billions of dollars in funding cuts overall. The cuts harmed several critical environmental health and housing programs that impact healthy housing, including the National Housing Trust Fund, HOME, and CDBG. We will continue advocacy to lift the onerous budget caps and increase HUD and CDC funding levels.


Please Take Action Today:

Call Senator Susan Collins (R-ME) and Senator Jack Reed (D-RI), the top Republican and Democrat on the Senate HUD appropriations subcommittee:

  1. Call Senator Collins at 202.224.2523 and say: "I'm calling to thank Senator Collins for maintaining level funding for HUD's Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control. I greatly appreciate her standing up again for the health and well-being of America's children and communities."
  2. Call Senator Jack Reed at 202.224.4642 and say: "I'm calling to thank Senator Reed for maintaining level funding for HUD's Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Hazard Control and for offering an amendment to increase that funding. I greatly appreciate him standing up again for the health and well-being of America's children and communities."

Also, please forward this email to any friends and colleagues in Maine and Rhode Island, and ask them to make the phone call too!

Join the National Safe and Healthy Housing Coalition.


Updates:

  1. HUD Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes (OLHCHH):
    • On June 9, the House of Representatives passed its HUD appropriations bill cutting HUD’s OLHCHH funding by $35 million to $75 million in 2016.
    • On June 25, the Senate appropriations committee voted in a bipartisan effort to maintain level funding for HUD's OLHCHH at $110 million in 2016.
  2. CDC Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention Program:
    • On June 24, the House Appropriations Committee voted to cut this program by $1/2 million to $15 million in 2016.
    • On June 25, the Senate Appropriations Committee voted to maintain level funding for CDC's Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention program at $15.5 million in 2016.
Several representatives and senators spoke out and offered amendments in favor of the HUD Office of Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention programs, and Representative David Price (D-NC) mentioned the Partnership Effort for the Advancement of Children's Health (PEACH) of Durham, North Carolina, by name. Go PEACH!


Next Steps:

The National Center for Healthy Housing and the National Safe and Healthy Housing Coalition will work to increase the overall budget caps to allow for funding increases to HUD and CDC, and continue to advocate for level or increased funding to healthy homes programs. The House and Senate will continue to deliberate and negotiate final appropriations levels throughout the summer and fall, but the bills passed this week will provide a likely baseline.

Join the National Safe and Healthy Housing Coalition.


Quotes from Capitol Hill:

From the June 25, 2015, Senate Appropriations Committee hearing:

"[This amendment] provides additional resources to protect Americans and ensure their safety. For example, it would add 10 million dollars to lead hazard reduction. This has been a curse, particularly in low-income, older neighborhoods, and we have them all across the county. And once a child is infected by lead, that child's cognitive ability, that child's ability to succeed in school and to contribute to this community, is devastated. And it’s completely avoidable. You simply have to get the lead out."

‎        –Senator Jack Reed (D-RI), Ranking Member, HUD appropriations subcommittee


"I do want to address just one point, specific point that the senator made, and that has to do with lead hazards, which we have worked on for years. For 18 years we've worked on this, we've had hearings in our home states, and I would say that, first of all, the House bill slashed this program to only 75 million. We have funded it at 110 million dollars, which is the same level as last year. So I don't want anyone to leave this room under this mistaken impression that we had slashed the program for lead hazard removal out of old housing stock, because that just would be inaccurate. "

‎       –Senator Susan Collins (R-ME), Chair, HUD appropriations subcommittee


"This bill would be better if we had a bipartisan agreement to lift the onerous sequester funding levels and with the resources in the amendment Ranking Member Reed will offer. His amendment would allow us to meet more of our country's infrastructure and community needs by providing $3.9 billion for aviation and rail safety, housing, lead paint abatement, and transportation infrastructure."

‎      –Senator Barbara Mikulski (D-MD), Vice-Chair, HUD appropriations committee

What Lead Poisoning Did to My Family - Part II

While lead poisoning is something my son Sean will live with for the rest of his life, the outcome could have been much worse had the local and state health departments not had the resources to help us. Without federal funding for both of these agencies, Sean would never have been tested for lead by a WIC nurse. Our home would not have been tested for lead-based paint in time to save us from an environmental hazard. There would not have been any nurse-related check ups and blood work schedules in place. We would not have been directed to AEA 267 to oversee my son’s education.

To put it simply, we might never have known that Sean was lead poisoned. Or worse, we might have lost him. We will forever be thankful to Mike Prideaux, the Black Hawk County Health Department Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program, and Rita Gergely, Iowa Department of Public Health who have been a huge part of our lives over these past nine years.

 

Congress Delivers Lump of Lead - CDC Lead Poisoning Prevention Program Gutted

A recent op-ed highlighted the importance of partnerships between health care and housing. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Assistant Secretary, Raphael Bostic and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) President Risa Lavizzo-Mourey state that “housing policy is health policy” and “preventing disease is cheaper than treating illness.” We couldn’t agree more.

Pending Funding Cuts to Lead Poisoning Prevention Make Daily News

On Monday, the Boston Globe published an article about how the U.S. is preparing to cut aid for lead poisoning prevention efforts.

National Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Week

I had the good fortune to be working for Senator Jack Reed in 1999 when he introduced a resolution (S. Res 199) to establish National Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Week in October. It is both ironic and sad that during the one week each year when we celebrate childhood lead poisoning prevention, we are simultaneously engaged in a battle to protect one of the key federal childhood lead poisoning prevention programs from evisceration.

Disqus Comments

Archive

Archive by Years
Tags
Categories