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Healthcare Financing of Healthy Homes - Nationwide Survey Results and Recommendations Now Available

NCHH has released two new reports summarizing results from a 2014 nationwide survey to identify states where healthcare financing for lead follow-up or home-based asthma services is already in place or pending.  

The full length survey report documents current policies regarding reimbursement for environmental health services in the homes of people with asthma and children exposed to lead. It contains the project’s complete findings and methodology as well as a wealth of supporting information.  

A shorter recommendations report highlights opportunities for increasing access to these benefits. It includes an executive summary with key findings and several recommendations for galvanizing an increased healthcare investment in lead follow-up and home-based asthma services.

Visit the healthcare financing library to read these new reports and explore other informational resources >


What can I do to prevent my child's exposure to lead?

Take these steps to reduce your child’s exposure to lead in your home/environment:

  1. Keep your child away from painting and repair work that disturbs paint, and make sure no paint chips or dust remain in the work area before your child enters.
  2. Pay attention to peeling paint: report it to your landlord if you’re a tenant so that repairs will get made (and call code enforcement or legal aid if there’s no response); and repair it safely if you’re a homeowner.
  3. Wash your child’s hands, toys, bottles, pacifiers, and any other items your child often puts in his or her mouth.
  4. Regularly clean floors, windowsills, and dusty places with wet mops or wet cloths to pick up any dust.
  5. Use only cold tap water for making baby formula, drinking and cooking. Let the water run for a few minutes first.
  6. Avoid using products from other countries such as: health remedies, eye cosmetics (i.e., kohl, kajal, surma), candies, spices, snack foods, clay pots and dishes, painted toys, and children’s jewelry. These items may contain high levels of lead.
  7. Remove shoes before entering your home.
  8. Any household member who does construction work or other work that may involve lead should remove work clothes before entering; wash them separately.

For more information regarding understanding your child's blood lead level, click here.

For more information regarding lead in toys, click here.

I was told that my child's blood lead level was "negative" the last time that I had him/her tested. Should I have him/her re-tested?

Ask your physician for the specific result of the last blood test. If the number was higher than 5 ug/dL, testing should be repeated to confirm. Having blood drawn from your child’s vein is more accurate than a finger stick test. Make sure other children under 6 years of age, developmentally delayed children, and pregnant women get tested as well.

For more information regarding understanding your child's blood lead level, click here.

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