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NCHH and APHA Release National Healthy Housing Standard

In partnership with the American Public Health Association and with thoughtful input from two expert committees, NCHH developed the National Healthy Housing Standard to inform and deliver housing policy that reflects the latest understanding of the connections between housing conditions and health. The National Committee on Housing and Health provided visionary leadership to position the Standard for relevance and widespread adoption. The Technical Review Work Group reviewed drafts, recommended improvements, and discussed significant issues during the development of the draft Standard.

Our focus in the National Healthy Housing Standard is the over 100 million existing homes in our country that offer the most significant opportunity to protect public health and reduce health disparities. Although new homes are typically safer and healthier, having been built to modern building standards, technologies, and regulations—and to ever-changing consumer expectations—the new construction market remains a fraction of the overall housing stock in the country. In contrast, regulations and industry practices affecting existing owner-occupied and rental housing, the focus of this document, have not kept pace with our knowledge about housing-related disease and prevention of disease and injury through routine maintenance. Learn more>

Ask NCHH

What can I do to prevent my child's exposure to lead?

Take these steps to reduce your child’s exposure to lead in your home/environment:

  1. Keep your child away from painting and repair work that disturbs paint, and make sure no paint chips or dust remain in the work area before your child enters.
  2. Pay attention to peeling paint: report it to your landlord if you’re a tenant so that repairs will get made (and call code enforcement or legal aid if there’s no response); and repair it safely if you’re a homeowner.
  3. Wash your child’s hands, toys, bottles, pacifiers, and any other items your child often puts in his or her mouth.
  4. Regularly clean floors, windowsills, and dusty places with wet mops or wet cloths to pick up any dust.
  5. Use only cold tap water for making baby formula, drinking and cooking. Let the water run for a few minutes first.
  6. Avoid using products from other countries such as: health remedies, eye cosmetics (i.e., kohl, kajal, surma), candies, spices, snack foods, clay pots and dishes, painted toys, and children’s jewelry. These items may contain high levels of lead.
  7. Remove shoes before entering your home.
  8. Any household member who does construction work or other work that may involve lead should remove work clothes before entering; wash them separately.

For more information regarding understanding your child's blood lead level, click here.

For more information regarding lead in toys, click here.

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